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Healthy Teeth, Healthy Heart?

Last updated 4 years ago

 

Research has found a surprising number of links between the state of your mouth and your heart. In fact, we now know that people who develop gum disease (either gingivitis, a milder form that results in inflammation and infection of the gums, or periodontitis, which develops when the inflammation and infection spread below the gum line) are nearly twice at risk for heart disease.

And in one study of 320 adults — half with heart disease — researchers found that these participants were also more likely to have gum disease, bleeding gums, and tooth loss.

Can Gum Disease Give You a Heart Attack?

“There is a very logical reason why the two may be connected,” says Peter M. Spalding, DDS, associate professor in the department of growth and development at the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry in Lincoln.

Some types of bacteria normally occur in your mouth, but if you’re not properly flossing and brushing to remove plaque (that white film caused by bacteria that stick to your teeth after you eat), your risk for gum disease increases. And once gum disease has developed, you create an environment for bacteria that do not normally grow in your mouth, Dr. Spalding says.

What’s more, because gum disease causes your gums to bleed, bacteria can move into your bloodstream, setting up an inflammatory process in the blood vessels, he adds.

How is this related to your heart? The bacteria may increase your risk for heart disease by contributing to the formation of clots or further plaque build-up in your arteries that can interfere with blood flow to the heart.

Important Steps for Your Teeth (and Heart)

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, half of all people over age 55 have gum disease. Gum disease is also the main reason people 35 and older lose their teeth.

If you happen to notice any of these symptoms, let City Dental  office know immediately — they could be warning signs of gum disease.

    Sour taste in the mouth

    Persistent bad breath

    Bleeding gums

    Swollen, tender gums

    Loose teeth

    Sensitive teeth

    Pain when chewing

 

And remember: Preventing gum disease — or treating it with deep cleanings, medication, or surgery — may just help you prevent heart problems down the road.

Your risk for gum disease increases as you get older, but staying on top of your  dental  visits at  our office  should start in childhood. Regular brushing, flossing, and  City Dental  check-ups can help you keep gum disease at bay.

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